Summer Update

The exhibit of my photography Reclamation: Twenty Years after the Rwandan Genocide closed at The Putney School, Michael S. Currier Center Gallery on May 15th. Thank you to all who attended and made it possible.

Stephen Schaub – for your guidance and artisanal printing of my works

Melissa Johnson – for your energy and assistance with a hammer, nail and eye!

Susan Brearey – for your coordination and support in curating this exhibit

Joyce Kennedy – for your expertise and care in framing

Eve Ogden Schaub – for your hospitality and talkin’ art

Claudine Uwamahoro – for your friendship, curiosity and ambition

My colleagues and family for your continued encouragement and honest feedback

A few of the comments from the exhibit:

“Stunning, transcendent & harrowing!”

“So moving. Stunning photography and commentary adds such poignant dimension too.”

“Thank you for sharing with us a culture that has been left behind the scenes.”

“So very impressive – wonderful talent!”

I’m excited to be collaborating with a few artists here in the States and in Rwanda this summer; I will keep you all updated…

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Lines

m linesIt’s interesting what connects people…I met architect Rikke Jorgenson through a friend in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, and we talked about my fieldwork in Rwanda and got to talking about lines and space and light. Tim Ingold’s idea about “a world in which everyone and everything consists of interwoven or interconnected lines and lays the foundations for a completely new discipline: the anthropological archaeology of the line.”

Rikke, a Fellow at Arts Letters & Numbers in Averill Park, NY, invited me up to share my experiences and fieldwork and a few images from my current exhibit, Reclamation: Twenty Years after the Rwandan Genocide. I arrived on Friday night and was welcomed by the founding director, David Gersten, other Fellows and visiting artists—a creative international mix. Saturday morning, we met in the former textile storehouse now a beautiful open creative space.

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Photo: Samuel Allison

Everyone was so generous– giving feedback and ideas. David talked about the transformation of a project, how it can be of a theme and then is something separately.

View more of David Gersten’s talk on art and transformation

Exhibit: Reclamation Nov 2 – Dec 31

Reclamation 

Twenty Years after the Rwandan Genocide

Photography Exhibition  –  Carol McGorry

I am excited to announce my first exhibition from my fieldwork in Rwanda over the past three years. The show opened today at the Spiral Press Café in Manchester Center, Vermont. The photographs are connected by their stories of resilience and strength– truth, courage, dignity, love, joy, balance – reclamation in everyday Rwanda.

The exhibition runs from November 2 – December 31, 2015.

Opening Reception November 6, 5:30-8pm

Site-Responsive Collaborations in Rwanda

It’s time to go back to Rwanda. This time, it’s all about International Creative Collaboration…fiber, creative writing, photography, painting.  Again I am going with Master Weaver Melissa Johnson so, of course, we will be working with CHAHBA: INEZA PUTNEY Weaving Cooperative Project. And, with Claudine Uwamahoro, our friend from Kigali who visited us in the US over the winter, we will be working to develop a community project around writing and visual art.

New this journey, after researching artists in Rwanda and coming across this recent NY Times article, I contacted Uburanga Art Studio. We are excited to collaborate with them in various media. One such way is through a new self-funded project, The Dreamers, by New York City-based portrait and documentary photographer, Abby Kraftowitz. “Here’s how it works,” she says. “I provide a printed photograph of a portrait or a scene.  The print becomes a canvas for the artist to create in his or her voice, directly on the photograph with any medium reacting to this image of a perfect stranger.” These photographs are coming with us on the plane tomorrow!

Creative Writing will be a new collaboration this year as well. I discussed with the Uburanga Art Studio my intentions, and instead of formulating a plan before I leave, I will be doing a site-responsive creative writing session with the artists at the studio. My plan is to join with the artists as we individually respond in our own writing to either a Kinyarwanda word or local imagery that I’ve photographed all within a cooperative working space. Kigali is no stranger to cooperative working sessions. According to the NY Times article mentioned earlier: “The lively art scene has turned this once-quiet and traumatized city into a place where not just art openings but also literary readings, dance performances and concerts take place regularly in the courtyards of galleries, and artists give lunchtime lectures at cooperative working spaces.”

Looking forward to keeping you all posted on the collaborations while in the field.

Weaving and Leaving… Shetlands to Rwanda

Leaving today at noon for overnight flights to Rwanda to work with Melissa Johnson of The Putney School.  This is a follow-up to the trip Johnson and Putney School students made to Rwanda in July. At that time, they brought four Harrisville Looms to teach students how to weave and create income-generating opportunities working with CHABHA (Children Affected by HIV/AIDS). 

Johnson and I are packing a loom and yarn and knitting needles, so I’m going camera simple–bringing only my lightweight digital Olympus E-PL1 and just two lenses…one new that thankfully arrived just in time this morning before my flight. Although we’ll see as I close the bag…still thinking about throwing in a pinhole and a few rolls of film.

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Today’s trip is a second unexpected journey this summer connecting with weavers and textile artists.  In late July, I was in the Shetlands. There were so many highlights to share–like an outdoor circle of 80 knitters working on one project. This circle was made up of both Shetlanders, Nordics and myself… on my birthday no less!

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Knitting Circle at the Böd of Gremista

I was forging my own craft trail– to the South for a lesson in Fair Isle technique with Shetlander Elizabeth Johnston; to the North to visit with fiber artist Iwona Charleson who in addition to spinning yarn from her own croft-raised sheep takes time to create and handcraft one-of-a-kind polymer clay knitting needles.

Then, off to Yell on the ferry where my craft trail got the attention of two young French visitors. They asked to join along while they were en route to Unst, the most northerly point in the UK. I was happy to have co-pilots to remind me to stay to the left while driving to the weaving studio of Andy Ross. Ross is creating artistic and educational opportunities in a remote spot (900+ residents) for all ages. I had been following his blog for a couple of years now, so I couldn’t wait to meet him, see the space and share ideas. He gladly opened the doors to the three of us and within ten minutes had the French visitors weaving on a loom. What a privilege and so much more to share with you all about this part of the adventure. In the meantime, here is a photo of Cami, Carole and Andy at the loom.

Budapest Reel with Lomo Spinner

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Lomography Spinner camera makes for interesting motion when the subject is moving as well. Here the swirl of these Hungarian folk dancers is redoubled by the 360 spinning of the camera lens. It creates a kind of all-at-onceness that you can’t otherwise experience or take in with the eye. This image is a 30″ x 23″ print, scanned from the film and printed on Fabriano Artistico at Indian Hill Imageworks, VT.

Shot in Budapest. While roaming the streets, I walked  into a plaza and found myself in the midst of this festival.

Why I was in Budapest….

My friend Danielle and I were en route to Romania to volunteer for Habitat for Humanity. The build was a new home for a widow with two grown daughters; the three of them had been living in a one room dwelling with no indoor toilet, the one-room sat just next to the train tracks. It was the summer of 2011, and it was a scorcher. As we wore hard hats, face masks and goggles, sitting on Romanian scaffolding on the second floor to apply stucco to the exterior of the home… we were so hot, sooo hot in the over 110 degree sun, but we couldn’t help to not feel grateful for all that was back home.

With the crew: Kristin Holmes Rouse, team leader.

With the crew: Kristin Holmes Rouse, standing in white tee, our team leader.On the scaffoldingOn the scaffoldingThe home nearly finished in Cluj, RomaniaThe home nearly finished in Cluj, Romania